10 Best Bone Conduction Headphones

10 Best Bone Conduction Headphones

Written by Ramsay, In Headset, Published On
August 17, 2023
, 319 Views

The latest technology in headphones isn’t new at all. Bone conduction has been around for a long time, but now it’s being used in consumer electronics. Bone conduction headphones open the ear canal so you can still hear what’s happening around you. They also let you enjoy high-quality music and phone calls.  The editing team looked at information about more than 10 of the best designs and ranked them based on price, weight, battery life, resistance to water, and other factors to find the best bone-conduction headphones for people with bad hearing.

Top 10 Bone Conduction Headphones

H2O Audio Tri Multi-Sport

H2O Audio Tri Multi-Sport

The H2O Audio Tri Multi-Sport, bone conduction headphones, is one of the more expensive choices on our list, but they are also the best value because they have the most features. They are great for swimming and working out on land. They come with an MP3 player that can hold 8GB of music, so you don’t have to depend on Bluetooth when you’re in the water. But you can still connect to Bluetooth and play any song or podcast you want when you’re not in the water.

YouthWhisper Bone Conduction Headphones

YouthWhisper Bone Conduction Headphones

The YouthWhisper Bone Conduction Headphones, which cost $36, were the best headphones we tried regarding how well they worked for the price. They easily connected with Bluetooth, fit well, and worked well immediately. Even though the sound quality wasn’t the best in our review, it was good enough to use all day. Once we got used to the bass-heavy audio prompts, the sound quality was good for such a low price.

Shokz OpenRun

Shokz OpenRun

The Shokz OpenRun, which used to be called the AfterShokz Aeropex before the company changed its name in December 2021, is a top-of-the-line headset. It is very small and light, and the sound quality is better than other bone-conduction headphones. They’re 13% lighter and 30% smaller than the company’s Trekz Air headphones, and they have an IP67 grade for waterproof, so they’re great for working out and using in the rain. Even though they are thin, they have two physical buttons to control the volume, and the change to a proprietary charging system helps them get a better grade for waterproofing.

The Zygo Solo

The Zygo Solo

The Zygo Solo is the only pair of bone-conduction headphones we’ve tried that can stream music and podcasts from a phone sitting by the pool. These use an FM radio instead of Bluetooth, which can only go through water for a short distance. The radio is big, and the headset isn’t very small either. But the emitter didn’t bother us, and the headset stayed comfortable while we worked out.

Shokz OpenComm UC

Shokz OpenComm UC

These bone-conduction headphones from Shokz are great for people who work from home and are on calls all day. They don’t cause pressure to build up, so you can stay comfortable all day. It has an adjustable DSP noise-cancelling boom microphone that stops outside noise while you talk. This makes it great for use in a variety of work settings. Also, these headphones use Bluetooth 5.1 technology, which lets you stay linked from up to 328 feet away.

Philips Go A7607

Philips Go A7607

These bone-conduction headphones are perfect for people who want a pair of headphones they can take from the office to the gym and back again. They have an IP66 grade, which means they can stand up to water and sweat. Because they have open ears, they are great for people who want to know about their surroundings and what is being streamed. ZDNet tested them and found they “stay comfortably in place” even when running or walking.

Mojawa Mojo1

Mojawa Mojo1

Like the Shokz OpenRun Pro, the Mojawa Mojo1 shows that bone-conduction headphones no longer have to make sound quality sacrifices. The Mojo1 doesn’t cover your ears, but it still gives you surprising bass that will keep you going during a tough workout. Their IP67 grade means they can easily fight dust, sweat, and splashes.

Shokz Trekz Air

Shokz Trekz Air

If you’re looking for a more affordable alternative to the company’s OpenRun headphones, the Shokz Trekz Air is a great choice. The Trekz Air isn’t quite as compact or lightweight, but they have an IP55 rating, making them suitable for sweaty activities. Bone-conduction headphones have never sounded better, yet they were challenging to hear in noisy environments.

Padmate S30

Padmate S30 

The Padmate S30 could be just what you need if you want to try out bone-conduction headphones but want to spend only what you might like. It sounds less rich and detailed than a higher-end headset, but it could be a good choice if you want to listen to talks or podcasts while you work out instead of music.

Pyle

Pyle

This set of bone-conduction headphones by Pyle is also fully waterproof and has an IPX6 rating. It costs a fair amount. If you don’t like things that break easily, the $70 Pyle Bone Conduction Headphones might be a good choice. This pair can play at full power for up to 3 hours and be left on for 240 hours. The 4.1 Bluetooth technology can reach up to 35 feet away, making pairing easy.

Tayogo

Tayogo 

These bone-conduction headphones from Tayogo cost only $40, much less than any of the other choices on this list. Even though they don’t have a lot of features or are waterproof, they are solid and reliable headphones at a price that is easy to afford. Many people who tried these headphones liked how well they stayed in place while running or working out. The sound quality and balance are generally good, but they may give you an itchy feeling when used at high volumes. These can last up to 6 hours on a full charge, which is only a few hours less than choices that are much more expensive.

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