What Goes Into Writing a Book That Gets Made Into a Movie?

What Goes Into Writing a Book That Gets Made Into a Movie?

Written by Deepak Bhagat, In Business, Published On
January 3, 2023
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Writing a book that gets made into a movie involves several steps and considerations. Here are some things that may go into the process:

  • Developing a compelling story: The most important aspect of a book that gets made into a movie is the story. It should be engaging, well-structured, and have compelling characters.
  • Crafting compelling characters: The characters in the book should be well-developed and relatable, with their own motivations, desires, and flaws.
  • Building a cohesive plot: The plot should be well-crafted and move the story forward in a logical and engaging way.
  • Using descriptive language: The book should use descriptive language to help the reader visualize the world and characters of the story.
  • Editing and revising the manuscript: As with any book, it’s important to edit and revise the manuscript to ensure it is the best it can be before it is submitted for publication.
  • Submitting the manuscript to a publisher: Once the manuscript is complete, it must be submitted to a publisher for consideration.
  • Marketing and promoting the book: Once the book is published, the author may need to market and promote it to increase its visibility and boost sales.
  • Optioning the film rights: If the book is successful, it may attract the interest of film studios or producers who are interested in adapting it into a movie. The author or their agent may negotiate a deal to sell the film rights to the book.

What Goes Into Writing a Book That Gets Made Into a Movie?

Writing a Book

Working with screenwriters and filmmakers: If the book is optioned for a movie adaptation, the author may be involved in the process of adapting the book into a screenplay and working with the filmmakers to ensure that the movie stays true to the spirit of the book.

Write a Driving Plot with a Solid Narrative Arc

A driving plot with a solid narrative arc is a story that is well-structured and moves the reader or viewer along a clear and engaging journey. Here are some tips for writing a driving plot with a solid narrative arc:

  1. Start with a compelling hook: Begin the story with a hook that captures the reader’s attention and sets the stage for the journey that follows.
  2. Introduce the main characters and their goals: In the early stages of the story, introduce the main characters and their motivations, desires, and goals.
  3. Set up the conflict: Establish the main conflict or problem that the characters will face and the stakes involved in resolving it.
  4. Build the story’s momentum: Use plot twists, setbacks, and other story elements to keep the reader or viewer engaged and increase the story’s momentum.
  5. Develop the characters: As the story progresses, delve deeper into the characters and their motivations, allowing them to grow and change over the course of the narrative.
  6. Reach the climax: The climax is the high point of the story, where the conflict is resolved and the characters’ goals are achieved or not.
  7. Offer resolution: After the climax, wrap up loose ends and provide a sense of resolution for the characters and the story as a whole.

Develop Dynamic, Three-Dimensional, and Compelling Characters

Developing dynamic, three-dimensional, and compelling characters is an important aspect of writing a story. Here are some tips for creating dynamic and well-rounded characters:

  1. Give your characters goals and motivations: All characters should have their own desires and goals that drive their actions and decisions.
  2. Make your characters multidimensional: Avoid stereotypes and cliches by giving your characters a range of characteristics and traits.
  3. Give your characters flaws and vulnerabilities: No character is perfect, so make sure to give your characters flaws and vulnerabilities that make them relatable and human.
  4. Develop your characters over the course of the story: Allow your characters to change and grow as they face challenges and conflicts in the story.
  5. Use dialogue and action to reveal character: In addition to describing your characters, use their words and actions to reveal their personalities and traits.

Craft a Visceral Setting

Crafting a visceral setting involves using descriptive language and sensory details to help the reader or viewer feel fully immersed in the world of the story. Here are some tips for crafting a visceral setting:

  1. Use descriptive language: Use vivid and detailed language to describe the setting and help the reader or viewer visualize it.
  2. Use sensory details: Use the five senses to describe the setting and help the reader or viewer feel like they are really there.
  3. Make the setting an integral part of the story: The setting should be more than just a backdrop; it should be an integral part of the story and influence the characters and events.
  4. Use the setting to reflect the mood and tone of the story: The setting should help to establish the mood and tone of the story and contribute to the overall atmosphere.

The show, Don’t Tell

“Show, don’t tell” is a writing technique that involves using descriptive language and actions to convey information and emotions, rather than simply telling the reader or viewer directly. Here are some tips for showing rather than telling in your writing:

  1. Use descriptive language: Instead of telling the reader or viewer how a character feels, describe the character’s actions and expressions to show their emotions.
  2. Use dialogue and action to reveal character: Instead of telling the reader or viewer about a character’s personality or traits, use the character’s words and actions to reveal these aspects of their personality.
  3. Use sensory details: Use the five senses to describe the setting, characters, and events in the story, rather than simply telling the reader or viewer about them.
  4. Avoid abstract language: Instead of using abstract words or concepts, use concrete details and examples to help the reader or viewer understand and connect with the story.

Don’t Write a Screenplay Masquerading as a Book

Writing a Book

When writing a book, book consultation online focus on crafting a well-developed story and engaging characters, rather than simply writing a screenplay masquerading as a book. Here are some tips for writing a book rather than a screenplay:

  1. Focus on character development: In a book, you have more space and time to delve into the characters and their motivations, desires, and flaws. Take advantage of this to create fully-realized and dynamic characters.
  2. Use descriptive language: In a book, you have more space to describe the setting, characters, and events in detail. Use descriptive language to help the reader visualize and connect with the story.
  3. Explore subplots and themes: In a book, you have the opportunity to explore subplots and themes in greater depth. Use this space to add depth and complexity to your story.
  4. Use internal monologue: In a book, you can use internal monologue to give readers insight into a character’s thoughts and feelings. This can be a powerful tool for revealing character and advancing the plot.

Conclusion

To sum up, writing a book that gets made into a movie involves developing a compelling story with well-crafted characters, a cohesive plot, and descriptive language. It also involves editing and revising the manuscript, submitting it to a publisher, and possibly marketing and promoting the book. If the book is successful, it may attract the interest of film studios or producers who are interested in adapting it into a movie.

The author or their agent may negotiate a deal to sell the film rights to the book. If the book is optioned for a movie adaptation, the author may be involved in the process of adapting the book into a screenplay and working with the filmmakers to ensure that the movie stays true to the spirit of the book.

To craft a compelling story, it’s important to create dynamic, three-dimensional characters, build a cohesive plot with a solid narrative arc, and craft a visceral setting. It’s also important to show rather than tell and avoid writing a screenplay masquerading as a book. By following these tips, you can write a book that has the potential to be made into a successful movie.

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